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Ps. ALEX AMRSTRONG: “The Religious Fraternity Has Been Treated Unfairly In This COVID-19 Era

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The founder of Potter’s Family Chapel has called for the immediate release of pastors who were jailed for not adhering to directives imposed by the president.

Alex Armstrong said this is as a result of the non-adherence to laid down safety protocols during the governing NPP’s Parliamentary primaries on Saturday.

“Some pastors have been disgraced and insulted because we all stood and prayed for you before you became president. I prayed everywhere I went and prayed for you because God spoke to me that you will become president, you didn’t pay me and I don’t need anything from him or any MP,” he told his congregants on Sunday.

Government has outlined protocols which churches must adhere as they are given the green light to worship with congregants after being closed for months to curb the spread of Covid-19. Up to 100 worshipers can congregate in churches, mosques and other places of worship and they can worship for one hour.

The threshold is, however, 25 per cent attendance, which means the number could be smaller for congregations with smaller numbers. The leaders of these bodies are, however, expected to ensure their members adhere to proper social distancing protocols during worship.

This, some of the pastors have criticised because they believe certain gatherings are allowed which disobey the directives by the president. Citing one such event, Alex Armstrong said he observed how people were hugging and dancing together at the just-ended NPP Parliamentary primaries.

“Look at what happened yesterday, it is sad…how they were hugging, dancing, jumping and running [around]. That one nobody has arrested them,” he noted.

He, therefore wants the pastors arrested and jailed to be “released immediately other than that it will be a curse on all the politicians…other than that, judgement will come from above.”

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Schools In Kenya To Resume Academic Lessons In 2021

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Despite lifting travel restrictions within the country, the authorities in Kenya say schools will remain shut until 2021, while those of higher learning could resume in September, APA can report on Tuesday. Subsequently, terminal exams for both levels – the Kenya Primary Certificate Exams, and the Kenya Secondary Certificate Exams – have also been cancelled.

The decision is based on the evolution of the coronavirus pandemic in the East African country. There are over 8,000 confirmed cases as at June 6. President Kenyatta on the same day announced the partial lifting of a curfew on hotspots whiles a number of restrictions were also eased. The president at the time only mentioned that despite places of worship being allowed to reopen, Sunday and Islamic weekend schools were to remain closed.

A number of countries across Africa have opted for a gradual reopening of school, more often allowing final year students back to prepare for exams.

According to the Education ministry, classes will not resume in primary and secondary schools until next year as a precaution against the spread of the coronavirus. The Kenyan government upon the advise of its Health ministry closed all schools in the country last March as the coronavirus pandemic took hold.

When classes resume next year, all students would have to remain in their current forms as no national or external exams are being planned this year. George Magoha, the country’s Education minister said however that college and university students will resume classes in September. “They will be under strict health regulations,” he added.

Kenya continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic with cases steadily rising each day. Government have locked down a handful of counties including the capital Nairobi and imposed a night-time curfew as part of containment efforts.

This rolling page will continue to give updates on major occurrences as relates to the East African country. You can follow Kenya’s March – April 2020 COVID-19 updates on our earlier page.

Kenya as of May 10 was the fourth most impacted country in the East / Horn of Africa region only behind Djibouti, Sudan and Somalia. Government also rolled out mass testing in virus hot spots, borders remain shut and a ban on public gatherings continues.

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Senegal Erupts Into Protests Over COVID-19 Lockdown Measures

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Protests have erupted in Dakara, Mbacké, Touba, Tambacounda and Diourbel with youths taking to the streets to protest against the curfew and ban on regional travel amid the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak. Clashes have also occurred between the protesters and security forces in Senegal according to reports by Aljazeera. The lockdown measures have been in effect for almost three months now as part of efforts to curb the spread of the pandemic.

According to AFP, at least 70 protesters have been arrested thus far. However, the protests are set to continue indefinitely with President Macky Sall having extended the lockdown measures to the end of June.

Unrest in the religious city of Touba prompted the caliph of the Mouride Brotherhood, Serigne Mountakha Mbacke, to make a late-night television appearance. Mbacke appealed to protesters saying, “Go home. Tomorrow we will look at the source of the problems and how to address them. I don’t think we have ever seen this in Touba.”

Similar protests recently erupted in Guinea with six protesters losing their lives following clashes with the police and security forces. Roadblocks set up by authorities in Coyah and Dubreka sparked unrest with protesters claiming that they were being mistreated and extorted by authorities when entering and exiting the capital city.

The total number of coronavirus cases in Africa now stands at just over 160 000 cases and at leat 4600 reported deaths. Senegal has just under 4000 cases and 45 deaths while Guinea has approximately 3933 cases and 23 deaths according to BBC‘s Coronavirus in Africa tracker.

– Rufaro Samanga/Okay Africa

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#JUSTICEFORUWA: Nigerians Call For Justice Following The Murder Of A Student In Church

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LAGOS STATE – Monday, June 1, 2020 – Nigerians are fed up with the prevalent and continued gender-based violence in the country and are rallying online under the banner of #JusticeForUwa. Those who are on the ground have already begun to mobilise crowds in order to protest.

Recently, 22-year-old student Vera Omozuwa was murdered last week in a Benin City church. Omozuwa, who was studying microbiology at the University of Benin, was reportedly attacked by a group of men and subsequently succumbed to her injuries in a hospital three days later.

Many have called on the government and those involved in the investigation of Omozuwa’s murder to ensure that justice is served for her, her family and the hundreds of women who continue to experience violence at the hands of men.

What does remain unclear, however, is how Omozuwa was brutally attacked in a church during broad daylight without anyone coming to her aid.

Commenting on gender-based violence in Nigeria, Amnesty International released the following statement:

“While the nation is still coming to terms with this gross violation, in Jigawa state 11 men were arrested for raping a 12-year old girl at Limawa in Dutse, the state capital. Although rape is a crime in Nigeria government’s response to it continues to be, woefully inadequate…Rising cases of rape across Nigeria is a result of the failure of law enforcement to ensure that rapists face justice. We are deeply concerned that perpetrators of rape in Nigeria invariably escape punishment.”

The death of Omozuwa came just a day after 16-year-old Tina Ezekwe was reportedly shot by a stray bullet after two police officers fired shots during an unconfirmed incident in Lagos. Although the teenager was rushed to the hospital, she died two days later, according to Nigeria’s Premium Times.

Last year, hundreds of Nigerian women took to the streets in protest following a spate of murders that took the lives of eight women in various Port Harcourt hotels.

– Rufaro Samanga/Okay Africa

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Gov’t Of Ghana Receives Equipment That Tests 2,300 Samples In 24 Hours

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GREATER ACCRA – Thursday, May 14, 2020/www.gbafrica.net/ – The Ministry of Health has announced its receipt of MIC-PCR diagnostic equipment and kits from the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) to help in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

According to the information given by the Ministry of Health, the equipment has the capacity to test 2,300 samples within a 24 hour period.

“This will help the country in dealing with the issue of backlog of samples taken from COVID-19 suspected cases as the country embarks on more testing to contain the disease,” the Ministry stated.

The University of Health and Allied Sciences (UHAS) laboratory in Ho began testing for COVID-19 on Monday, April 27, 2020.

The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the state organization in Ghana involved with surveillance of the use of nuclear energy in Ghana.

  • Kulpeeps Ghana
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