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AZALI/ Ghanaian Movie To Show On Netflix

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GREATER ACCRA, GHANA, January 30, 2020/www.gbafrica.net/ – Azali, a 2018 Ghanaian drama film written by Gwandellen Quartey and directed by Kwabena Gyansah which was selected as the Ghanaian entry for the Best International Feature Film at the 92nd Academy Awards will be available on American media-services provider and production company; Netflix on February 7, 2020 for people who are passionate about movies; Cinephiles to stream.

The Ghanaian written and directed film tells the story of 14-year-old Amina, who flees an arranged marriage with a 70-year-old farmer only to end up a victim of human traffickers, but somehow escapes to Accra. She must decide between surviving Ghana’s bustling capital, thus a harrowing journey of sex work and poverty in the slums of Accra and returning home to an arranged marriage.

The film made history last year when it became the first Ghanaian film to be submitted to the Oscars for consideration in the Best International Feature Film category. However, it was not selected. The Academy picked Bong Joon Ho’s terrific class-war drama-thriller Parasite alongside Pain and Glory, Honeyland, Corpus Christiarranged and Les Miserables.

However Since its debut premiere on October, 2018, the film has scored multiple nominations, including 18 nominations at the 2019 Golden Movie Awards Africa (GMAA) and won the best feature film at the 2018 edition of African International Film Festival (AFRIFF) in Lagos Nigeria. Azali stars debutant Asana Alhassan as Amina; other cast members include Adjetey Anang (The Gold Coast Lounge), Ama K. Abebrese (The Burial of Kojo), Peter Ritchie, Akofa Edjeani Asiedu and Emmanuel Nii Adom Quaye.

In Theatres

South African Film ‘MOFFIE’ is Screening Amid COV!D-19 Pandemic

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Due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, which has seen South Africa and other countries undergo a lockdown, production companies and other businesses are looking for alternative methods to conduct business. The production team behind the recently released South African film MOFFIE announced an alternative method to distribute the film after cinema screenings were affected by the lockdown.

A few weeks ago, the film’s producer, Eric Abraham, as well as director Oliver Hermanus, started a process of creating a Plan B as an alternative means for people to watch the critically acclaimed film at home. The film’s director Oliver Hermanus was quoted as saying in a press release:

“We really want you all to see Moffie, and over the last few weeks set up a system to bring our film to the safety of your home. You may be stuck indoors, so hopefully we can keep you entertained.”

Tickets go for R150 per viewing. Your ticket will be valid to use for 24 hours from the time of purchasing. The film can only be watched once from start to finish – but you can press pause at any time during the 24-hour period. However, if you navigate away from the current viewing (e.g. close the tab or browser, refresh the page, restart your computer) your session will be lost, and your ticket invalid.

MOFFIE is a critically acclaimed South African film that was released in March. It follows the story of a young conscript who battles to survive compulsory military service in apartheid-South Africa while coming to terms with his sexual orientation. The film received positive reviews from both South African and foreign publications.

Watch the MOFFIE official website to watch the film.

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ALOE VERA/ A Peter Sedufia Movie Tops As The Highest Grossing Film Across Africa

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GREATER ACCRA, GHANA, Sunday March 15, 2020/www.gbafrica.net/ – Indigenous Ghana produced movie, Aloe Vera, premiered on March 6th, 2020, has become the highest-grossing film on the continent of Africa within the first weekend in cinemas in the country. Prior to the premiere, the entire country especially cinema lovers got into the groove in anticipation of its release.

The hype surrounding the film was palpable in Africa has translated into real profits for the Peter Sedufia produced movie. First week after its release, it became the highest grossing film of all time on the African continent, according to a data released by Comscore (the official box Office data partner), Nigeria on March 9, 2020. The data is based on a provisional infomation reported by participating West Africa exhibitors.

Aloe Vera has grossed 10,313,607 Naira (just under 155,253.13 Ghanaian Cedis) in Africa. In this context, it’s significant that audiences, particularly those registered under the cinema exhibitors association of Nigeria went to the cinema to watch a Ghanaian produced film (though it was shown in two cinemas in Ghana – Silverbird Cinemas (Accra Mall and Westhills Mall). It speaks to the rewards that diversity offers in any industry and the importance of authentic representation. As the continent’s entertainment industry continues to grow, so does its potential audience.

Aloe Vera worked its way into the hearts of cinema lovers due to its authentic and organic nature witnessed in the storyline and also within the props, where a whole community was built from the grounds – the first of its kind in Ghana – for the shoot. The direction of the film was led by none other than the most talked-about director of the moment, Peter Sedufia and produced by Laurene Manaa Abdallah for OldFilm Productions.

Peter Sedufia has previously worked on films such as Keteke and Sidechic Gang, the two productions are on Netflix, while Aloe Vera is still showing at the cinemas and a regional tour across the country just commenced.

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Aloe Vera Movie Hit Cinemas With A Sold Out Premiere In Ghana

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GREATER ACCRA, GHANA, Monday March 9, 2020/www.gbafrica.net/ – After months of promotion and getting fans in their feels towards ALOE VERA with posters, the arrival of the trailer drew movie lovers even closer to it, categorically and emphatically classifying it among the best films to ever come out of Africa.

Sedufia invented his own set to shoot a movie, a difficult feat to achieve in this part of the world due to the consistent low budget for productions. But Peter took the bull by the horn regardless of the budget and created a remarkable product that’s about to change the course of production in the country.

ALOE VERA created a unique colour pattern between two communities living within the same location but separated by a hem initiated by a long-standing historical dispute. The blue colour represented the ALOEs while the Yellow represented the VERAs. Hence, during the premiere on March 6th, 2020 at the Silverbird Cinemas at Westhills Mall and Accra Mall, movie lovers who wanted to have the first exclusive peek at the movie turned up in the aforementioned colours.

The sold-out premiere was flooded by fans from all walks of life, giving Silverbird Cinemas no choice than to prolong the premiere time to late into the night in addition to the already proposed time of 5 pm, 7 pm and 9 pm. Interestingly, there was so much pressure, most of the cast in the movie hardly got space on the red carpet to take pictures, fans mobbed them. Every single fan wanted the opportunity to take pictures with either an ALOE or VERA.

Stars of the movie included Nana Ama Mcbrown, Gloria Sarfo, Aaron Adatsi, Alexandra Ayirebi-Acquah, Fred Amugi, Kofi Adjorlolo, Roselyn Ngissah, Salma Mumun, Priscilla Opoku Agyeman and several up-and-comers as well. This happens to be Peter Sedufia’s third solo effort after Keteke and Sidechic Gang.

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WHO IS THE BOSS/ A Romantic Film Of Gaping Flaws – [Movie Review]

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Sharon Ooja as the leading lady in ‘Who’s the Boss’ takes a chunk of the film’s misses. It is almost impossible to point out Naz Onuzo’s directing style owing to the fact that ‘Who’s the Boss’ is the accomplished screenwriter and producer’s directorial debut.

The very first teaser for ‘Who’s the Boss’ was promising for a number of reasons. For one, the choice of its protagonist. However, those lofty dreams become short lived upon seeing the movie. Sharon Ooja is once again forced to embrace a typecast that’s lived just as long as her career.

Sharon Ooja is Liah, a budding advertising executive who must square up with Hauwa (Funke Akindele Bello), an insatiable boss who sabotages her chances of getting promoted.

She elicits the help of Lekan ( Blossom Chukwujekwu), a certified playboy that she eventually falls in love with. Then there’s Jumoke (Ini Dima-Okojie), a sometimes selfish and sometimes selfless heiress. For the duration of the film, Jumoke struggles to find a place in the Lekan and Liah love story.

Onuzo as the film’s screenwriter leaves a lot undone with the characterization of Liah or that of any other character asides Lekan. It is not clear if Liah is independent or constantly requiring external validation or if she is spineless and unfashionable or conditionally so.

Beyond characterization, Ooja’s character disappointingly wears typecast shoes. Ooja might have featured in over a handful of released movies since Ndani TV web series ‘Skinny Girl In Transit’, but, she has been unable to display the dexterity required to convince the audience that she can be more than a pretty face.

Make no mistake, fans love Ooja. She is one straight out of a magazine beauty. Lamentably, beneath her flawless features lies an untapped talent held hostage by a beauty that might as well be her curse. It is sad that Filmmakers have let themselves be hypnotized by this curse.

In ‘Who’s the Boss’, the Sharon Ooja curse makes yet another frustrating appearance. Her character appears largely needy and unable to make uninfluenced decisions.

As a romantic film, ‘Who’s the Boss’ is not exactly fulfilling. Romance as a theme feels almost like a story filler as opposed to it being a major theme.

The film’s cinematographer (uncredited on poster), tries to experiment with the technical lighting of a romantic film. The ambience of the final scene where Lekan and Liah resolve their unconvincing conflict reflects a lack of warmth. It’s too dark with a harsh focus on its central characters. Dismally, that’s the best lighting experiment explored in the film. Other lighting attempts are basic at best.

In spite of its unnatural voice-over and echoing room sound flops, ‘Who’s the Boss’ might serve entertainment on some level. The chemistry between Chukwujekwu and Ooja for instance is amusing and easily relatable. Blossom is also a delight to see with how he delivers his Casanova character but of course, it’s Blossom.

If given a little more depth, the story had the potential of being totally worth the while.

(By: Precious ‘Mamazeus’ Nwogu )

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